Eating For Parkinson’s: What Foods Should You Avoid if You Have Parkinson’s Disease?

If you are living with Parkinson’s, you know that it is difficult to contend with some of the side effects. Because your central nervous system is affected by the disease, it is difficult for you to have control over your body and its functions. 

You know to know what foods to eat for Parkinson’s disease, and most importantly — what foods not to eat. We would be happy to help you out. 

Eating for Parkinson’s becomes simple when you follow the tips below. 

What Foods Should You Avoid?

It’s important that you know which foods are harmful to you when you have Parkinson’s. Here are a few on the list that should stay off of your grocery list:

1. Foods That Are High in Added Sugar

When there’s a lot of sugar in your food, it can throw off your energy level and make it difficult to handle your metabolism. It’s important to read the ingredient label, because it will let you know when certain food items have sugar that you might not even know about. 

There are so many different foods that are high in sugar, even if it isn’t sweet. For instance, sugar is used in a lot of frozen vegetable items because it is used to preserve the food. These sneaky grams of sugar add up and can hurt your health, especially if you have Parkinson’s. 

This can also be compounded to create diabetes complications and other health problems. 

2. Heavy Amounts of Meat and Animal Products

When you take in heavy amounts of meat and animal products, it can inflame your body and throw off your digestion. Constipation happens to be one of the common side effects of Parkinson’s disease, and eating heavy amounts of beef, chicken, pork, and other meat can add to it. 

It is also slower to digest, so your metabolism can slow down and you will have a difficult time balancing your energy levels. 

What’s more, there are certain types of medications that people take for Parkinson’s that can interfere with it. The abundance of protein can make your medication less effective. You will need to make sure that you are eating plenty of vegetables to offset it. 

You can still eat protein and should to support your health, but be mindful of the source. 

3. High Sodium Foods

When foods are high in sodium, they will lead to high blood pressure, which will lead to further Parkinson’s complications. It impedes your blood circulation and can cause swelling and discomfort. 

You’ll need to read the food label to make sure that you know how much you’re taking in, and whether or not there are any substitutes. 

4. Heavily Processed Food Items

Processed foods are bad for you because they have the potentially dangerous trifecta of sugar, sodium, and fat. It can create spikes in your insulin levels and lead to long-term health decline. 

Try to eat whole foods as much as possible and always know every ingredient that is included.

5. Foods That are Fried

When you eat too many fried foods, you will have your metabolism, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels thrown off. Look into baked alternatives that don’t contain as much sodium. 

Whenever you’re eating a diet that is heavy in fried foods, you will have a harder time dealing with Parkinson’s. 

What Foods Should You Be Eating?

So with that said, what foods should you be eating on a regular basis? A healthy diet is like medication, particularly if you have a condition like Parkinson’s. 

Along with regular exercise, make sure that you are eating the foods below:

1. Plenty of Green Vegetables

Leafy green vegetables are rich in so many different nutrients that you need on a regular basis. Fiber is one of the most important compounds that you need each day, because it helps your digestive system and gets rid of constipation problems. 

It also has plenty of Iron, Calcium, and Vitamin K, which are essential for your health and well-being. 

2. Different Types of Berries

Berries are an excellent source of anti-oxidants, fiber, and so many other nutrients. They prevent your body and organs from becoming inflamed, which helps with your digestion and overall well-being. 

You can get plenty of healthy energy without needing to turn to added sugar or high fructose corn syrup. Berries also have plenty of water, so you can stay hydrated throughout the day. Mix different types of berries, such as strawberries, blackberries, and blueberries into a smoothie each day so that you can get your fill. 

3. Eat Bananas Every Day

Eating bananas on a regular basis will help your digestion and provide you with a rich source of potassium. It will also give you plenty of healthy calories so that you don’t feel compelled to snack on unhealthy foods throughout the day. 

Bananas have plenty of electrolytes, which mean that your muscles will function better, which is huge for people that have Parkinson’s disease. 

 

Eating For Parkinson’s Disease

So what should you know about eating for Parkinson’s disease? The tips in this article are useful at letting you know what to avoid and what you should eat everyday. 

Take the time to cut certain foods out of your intake, and make sure to add others to your grocery list. 

If you’re in need of help, reach out to Training For All Ages so that you can get the work that you need for your condition. In this regard, contact us online or call us at (310)717-2940.

Jonathan Rose wants as many people as possible to reap the amazing benefits of exercising regularly and eating healthy.  He provides people with exercise programs that are specifically designed for them to set them up for success to get on a well rounded exercise program helping them:  get stronger, more flexible, reduce weight and body fat if needed, improve posture, improve balance, mobility and agility, as well as stamina.  

Since 1992 he has been training children, adults and seniors to help them get in their best shape.  He specializes in working with seniors and people with Parkinson’s. He is very concerned about older people getting regular exercise so they have the strength, mobility and balance to live their lives and to decrease their vulnerability to falling.  He also trains caregivers and family members to help incorporate exercise in the people they are taking care of.  He develops programs for people who have Parkinson’s to manage and reduce their symptoms and teaches the caregivers and family members to help manage as well.  He teaches them exercises and stretches to do.  

Jonathan has a degree in Exercise Science and is a NASM Master Trainer, Corrective Exercise Specialist, Senior Specialist, Weight Loss Specialist, and Behavior Change Specialist.  He is also a Corrective Exercise Specialist in The Biomechanics Method as well as has two certifications by Gary Gray, Certification in Applied Functional Science and 3D Maps.

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